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cat-fecal

Cat Fecal Exam

Internal parasites are common in cats. Often, cats do not show any outward signs of having worms. Occasionally, cats may pass adult worms or worm segments in their stool that can be easily seen. More frequently, the worms live in the intestinal tract of the cat, but they are not detected. Fecal exams allow veterinarians to detect intestinal worms by looking for the microscopic eggs that the adult worms shed in the stool.

What is fecal parasite screen?

A fecal parasite screen is a laboratory test that examines a stool sample from your cat for microscopic parasite eggs or other microscopic parasitic organisms, such as Giardia and coccidia. It is done using a microscope by an experienced laboratory technician or veterinary pathologist.

What does a fecal parasite screen reveal?

The fecal parasite screen reveals the presence of microscopic eggs from adult worms that are present inside the cat’s digestive tract, or the presence of microscopic parasitic organisms, such as Giardia or coccidia that have colonized the cat’s intestinal tract.

How is a fecal parasite screen done?

The screening test involves taking a stool sample and dissolving it in a diluent solution. The solution is allowed to stand for a period of time with a microscope slide in contact with the upper end of the container of diluent. This allows the parasite eggs to float to the top of the solution and contact the microscope slide. After the required standing time, the microscope slide is then examined under the microscope and scanned in all fields for parasite eggs and other parasitic organisms.

Cat stool sample instructions?

Collect the stool into any clean container and bring it to us as soon as possible. If there is going to be a delay, placing the sample in the fridge will help keep it as fresh as possible. The fresher the sample, the more accurate the results.

Cat stool test cost?

If you call the clinic, we are happy to go over pricing with you, based on your pet’s needs.

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